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This is a discussion on Forex Strategies within the Trading Systems forums, part of the Trading Forum category; What is a spread in forex trading? Every market has a spread and so does forex. A spread is simply ...

      
   
  1. #411
    Senior Member ForeCastle's Avatar
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    What Does a Forex Spread Tell Traders?

    What is a spread in forex trading?

    Every market has a spread and so does forex. A spread is simply defined as the price difference between where a trader may purchase or sell an underlying asset. Traders that are familiar with equities will synonymously call this the Bid: Ask spread.

    Below we can see an example of the forex spread being calculated for the EUR/USD. First, we will find the buy price at 1.13398 and then subtract the sell price of 1.3404. What we are left with after this process is a reading of .00006. Traders should remember that the pip value is then identified on the EUR/USD as the 4th digit after the decimal, making the final spread calculated as 0.6 pips.



    How to calculate the forex spread and costs

    Before we calculate the cost of a spread, remember that the spread is just the ask price less (minus) the bid price of a currency pair. So, in our example above, 1.13404-1.13398 = 0.00006 or 0.6 pips.

    Using the quotes above, we know we can currently buy the EUR/USD at 1.13404 and close the transaction at a sell price of 1.13398. That means as soon as our trade is open, a trader would incur 0.6 pips of spread.

    To find the total spread cost, we will now need to multiply this value by pip cost while considering the total amount of lots traded. When trading a 10k EUR/USD lot, you would incur a total cost of 0.00006 (0.6pips) X 10,000 (10k lot) = $0.6. If you were trading a standard lot (100,000 units of currency) your spread cost would be 0.00006pips (0.6pips) X 100,000 (1 standard lot) = $6.

    If your account is denominated in another currency, like GBP, you would have to convert it to US Dollars.



    Understanding a high spread and a low spread

    It’s important to note that the FX spread can vary over the course of the day, ranging between a ‘high spread’ and a ‘low spread’.

    This is because the spread can be influenced by multiple factors like volatility or liquidity. You will notice that some currency pairs, like emerging market currency pairs, have a greater spread than major currency pairs. Your major currency pairs trade in higher volumes compared to emerging market currencies, and higher trade volumes tend to lead to lower spreads under normal conditions.

    High spread

    A high spread means there is a large difference between the bid and the ask price. Emerging market currency pairs generally have a high spread compared to major currency pairs.

    Low spread

    A low spread means there is a small difference between the bid and the ask price. It is preferable to trade when spreads are low like during the major forex sessions. A low spread generally indicates that volatility is low and liquidity is high.

    Keeping an eye on changes in the spread

    News is a notorious time of market uncertainty. Releases on the economic calendar happen sporadically and depending if expectations are met or not, can cause prices to fluctuate rapidly. Just like retail traders, large liquidity providers do not know the outcome of news events prior to their release! Because of this, they look to offset some of their risk by widening spreads.

    Spreads can cause margin calls

    If you are currently holding a position and the spread widens dramatically, you may be stopped out of your position or receive a margin call. The only way to protect yourself during times of widening spreads is to limit the amount of leverage used in your account. It is also sometimes beneficial to hold onto a trade during times of spread-widening until the spread has narrowed.

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  2. #412
    Senior Member ForeCastle's Avatar
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    Oil Price Outlook: Bearish Breakdown

    The impact from Trump tariffs and deteriorating US China trade relations in addition to several other downside risks to global GDP growth have sent crude oil on a 16.5 percent nosedive over the month of May – and prices could still head lower. Market sentiment, as well as oil demand and prices, threaten to deteriorate further considering the barrage of high-impact economic events and data releases next week which look to provide the latest health check on risk appetite and could further spark cross-asset volatility.

    Forex Strategies-oil0106new.gif

    Recent crude oil carnage could be curbed, however, if the fundamental backdrop for global growth improves on the back of upbeat data or trade war rhetoric. Strength in the US economy may shine and inspire investor confidence if leading indicators like the ISM manufacturing and services PMI readings surprise to the upside. Although, markets are likely still digesting the looming effect from the US slapping a 5 percent tariff slapped onto all Mexican goods exports with any whiff of downward global GDP growth revisions risking more downside in oil.

    According to the latest CFTC Commitment of Traders data, net oil futures positioning shows a reduction in net short positioning as the volume of commercials longs outpaced that of shorts for the last 5 weeks. The bullish bets from commercial hedgers could provide crude oil prices with a bit of buoyancy, but it is noteworthy that non-commercial speculative futures traders have grown increasingly bearish over the last month as prices spiral lower.

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  3. #413
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    Bollinger Bands® and MACD Strategy

    Bollinger Bands® can provide invaluable signals for technical traders, and when combined with the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) indicator, gives traders insight into both volatility and momentum in the forex market.

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    What is the Bollinger and MACD Combination?

    As the title suggests, traders can make use of Bollinger Bands® in conjunction with MACD to support trade set ups. Bollinger Bands® allow traders to view the cyclical nature of volatility while the MACD is an effective trend-following, momentum indicator.

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    Using these two indicators together can assist traders when making higher probability trades as they can gauge the direction and strength of an existing trend, along with volatility. As a result, traders can use the MACD to assess if a trend is picking up in momentum or slowing down and setting up for a possible breakout; while the Bollinger Band® can be used as an entry trigger and subsequent confirmation of a trade.

    How to Use Bollinger Bands® and MACD to Trade Forex


    Traders can trade with Bollinger Bands® and MACD in a number of different ways but two of the most common ways to trade with these two indicators involve breakouts and trend trading.

    The MACD indicator supports the bullish trade as the MACD line has crossed the signal line and continues to move above the signal line, showing strong upward momentum. The Bollinger Band® then confirms the move to the upside as price begins to “walk the band” on increased volatility (expansion of the band).

    Stops can be placed below the lower Bollinger Band® or at the low of the descending channel. Targets can be placed at a previous high or significant level of resistance - while maintaining a positive risk to reward ratio. Since there is a possibility that the breakout trade turns into a trend reversal, traders should consider multiple target levels and manually move stops up or utilize a trailing stop.

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