Premium4 468x60 forex
Page 38 of 42 FirstFirst ... 28 36 37 38 39 40 ... LastLast
Results 371 to 380 of 418
Like Tree8Likes

Something to read

This is a discussion on Something to read within the Forex Trading forums, part of the Trading Forum category; GDP: A Brief But Affectionate History by Diane Coyle GDP is one economic model among several that could serve the ...

      
   
  1. #371
    Senior Member 1Finance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,519
    Blog Entries
    340

    GDP: A Brief But Affectionate History

    GDP: A Brief But Affectionate History
    by Diane Coyle

    Something to read-1111.png


    GDP is one economic model among several that could serve the purpose, but its use conveniently leads to policies that reflect the thinking of a particular school of economic monetary and fiscal policy advocates.

    We all know that in operating a business we need to be able to measure the profits of our company and then adjust our prices and
    production to make sure that there are enough profits to adequately fund the company. That is a relatively straightforward process, since the amount of money in the bank at the end of the month is a real number.

    Something to read-2222.png


    GDP: A Brief But Affectionate History is a fascinating 140-page book that I cannot recommend highly enough. This is simply the best book on GDP that I’ve ever seen. You can read it on a few hours’ plane ride or a lazy Sunday afternoon. And Ms. Coyle actually makes a
    relatively dry subject interesting and at times a page-turner. She has a true gift.

    Ms. Coyle starts with the predecessors to Adam Smith and takes us through the 17th century right up until today with the development of GDP, so we see the ebb and flow of ideas through time. Who knew the early developers of the model did not want to include defense
    spending, as they saw it as a wasteful, nonproductive activity? Or that Adam Smith thought the inclusion of services in the concept was
    misleading. “The provision of more services was a cost to the national economy, in his view. A servant was a cost to his employer, and did not create anything. Importantly, money spent on warfare or the interest on government debt was also being used unproductively. The nation’s wealth was its stock of physical assets less the national debt. National income was what derived from the national wealth.”

    Will the Real GDP Please Stand Up?

    GDP is a huge undertaking, full of rules, with almost as many exceptions to the rules, changes, fixes, and qualifications, so that, as one
    Amazon reviewer noted, GDP is in reality so complex there are only a handful of people in the world who fully understand it, and that does not include the commentators and politicians who pontificate about it almost daily. The quarterly release of GDP statistics is more akin to a religious service than anything resembling a scientific study. The awe and breathlessness with which the number is discussed is somewhat amusing to those who understand the sausage-making process that goes into producing the number. Whether the GDP reading is positive or negative, it often changes less in a given quarter than the margin of error in the figure itself, and it can be and generally is revised significantly – often many years later when almost no one is paying attention.

    GDP Is a Political Construction

    GDP has always been a political construction, subject to the ebb and flow of the intellectual and political climate, the need to raise taxes, and the military needs of the day. It is also a tool used to argue for or against income inequality (depending on what country you’re in).

    GDP is a financial construct at its heart, a political and philosophical abstraction. It is a necessary part of the management of the country, because, as with any enterprise, if you can’t measure it you can’t determine if what you are doing is productive. That said, the act of measuring GDP precipitates the observer effect writ large.
    Last edited by 1Finance; 01-27-2017 at 05:05 AM.
    Trading blogs || My blog

  2. #372
    Senior Member RelatedHugo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    835
    Blog Entries
    511

    High Frequency Trading Explained Simply

    High frequency trading has been in the news more, thanks in part to Michael Lewis’ new book, Flash Boys. This article presents a simple explanation of how and why high frequency trading works, and why it is good for small investors.

    We will begin by imagining a market with lots of small individual traders. Then we will look at how large institutional investors change the market. Next we will look at high frequency trading. Finally, we’ll explain how small investors are impacted.

    Start by imagining a stock with no particular news about it. The price is stable, but there are lot of small trades. Some investors have enjoyed gains but now think the stock is overpriced. Other investors have seen gains and have decided to jump on the bandwagon. Some investors have been watching it, and now have money to invest. Others have owned it and are happy with the stock but need some cash. So lots of orders are coming in, pretty evenly mixed between buy and sell orders. The price trend for the stock looks perfectly steady.

    Something to read-high-frequency.jpg


    Now consider that the traders are not all small investors. Large institutional traders are doing the same thing—some buying and some selling—but there’s a difference between them and individual investors. When a large mutual fund or pension fund places a buy order, it could be for a million shares, not a hundred shares. Similarly, sell orders from institutions come in very large quantities.

    Over the course of the day, these large institutional orders cause a lumpy pattern. The chart shows what such a price line looks like. There is no noticeable trend up or down, but each institutional order moves the market up or down, and it takes a while for the price to return to the underlying trend line. That’s illustrated with the red line in the accompanying chart.

    High frequency traders try to profit from the price movements caused by large institutional trades. When a mutual fund sells a million shares of a stock, the price dips—and HFTs buy on the dip, hoping to be able to sell the shares a few minutes later at the normal price. When a pension fund buys two million shares, the HFTs short-sell the stock, hoping to close their position at a profit. (Short selling is selling stock you don’t own; you borrow the shares from a stockbroker, sell them, and then later buy the stock to return the borrowed shares.)

    HFTs are buying when the price is below trend and selling when the price is above trend. This tends to reduce the price fluctuations. When they are successful, prices look like the blue line on the chart. The blips are smaller and shorter-lived.

    HFT is not as easy as this simple explanation sounds. First, there are many HFTs. If one is slow, the profit opportunity may have been captured by other HFTs. Second, not every blip is just a blip. If the stock is impacted by an downward trend in the overall stock market, the HFT would buy lots of different stocks—and then watch them all go down further. A good HFT has to be fast, but not so fast as to get caught be a surprise. In practice, the HFTs are no longer just looking at just one stock in isolation. They are looking at all the prices coming in, including stocks, bonds, commodities, futures and options. This massive data crunching helps them identify what are likely to be short-term blips but not long-lasting trends.

    In the early days, it was fairly easy. As more companies got into the business, the easy trades were quickly taken by others. HFTs needed to move faster and faster, while crunching ever more data to avoid losing trades. Much of the attention they have received lately is due to their extreme efforts to reduce their reaction time, which is measured in milliseconds. This effort is not made to be faster than individual investors or institutional investors; HFTs are already faster than them. Instead, the effort is made to be faster than competing HFTs.

    Now, how does high frequency trading impact those of us who are small investors? Look at that chart. If I place a simple buy or sell order, I may get lucky or unlucky. My buy order may be at a downward blip, but it may also be at an upward blip. I don’t want to get lucky if it means a chance of being unlucky; I’d rather trade at that underlying trend price.

    Further, investors face a spread between the price at which they buy (the “ask” price) and the price at which they sell (the “bid”). This bid-ask spread compensates the market makers for executing trades at exactly the time that I want to trade. The more volatile the stock price usually is, the wider the bid-ask spread. HFTs tend to narrow the bid-ask spread by protecting the market makers from bad news while they hold their positions. Thus, my trading costs get lower.

    High frequency trading is secretive and mysterious, but not at all evil. It make the stock market more efficient and helps small investors who trade at random times over the day. I could almost feel sorry for them being misunderstood—until considering that they have made far more money than I have.

    the source

    Trading Blogs || My Blog

  3. #373
    Senior Member ArticleMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    271
    Blog Entries
    155

    10 Sunday Reads - Super Bowl Prediction, Automation Is Coming, Era of Billionaire Rule, and more

    Something to read-image1111.jpg

    • Super Bowl Prediction: Wall Street Quants Are Taking the Falcons and the Points (MoneyBeat) but see The Patriots Are The NFL’s Greatest Dynasty (FiveThirtyEight)
    • Ed Thorp: the man who beat the casinos, then the markets (Financial Times)
    • Progressive ‘Fake News’ Is on the Rise (The Atlantic)
    • The phantom threat of terrorism (Boston Globe)
    • A robotics expert predicts that kids born in 2017 will never drive a car (Quartz)
    • Wilbur Ross and the Era of Billionaire Rule (Bloomberg Businessweek) see also This Astoundingly Complex Visualization Untangles Trump’s Business Ties (Wired)
    • The Radical Crusade of Mike Pence: Meet, quite possibly, the next president (Rolling Stone)
    • Refugees are already vigorously vetted. I know because I vetted them. (Washington Post)
    • Automation Is Coming for Our Porn Stars (Vice) see also The ‘iTunes of Blowjobs’ Launched Today (Vice)
    • Why Sports Are a Terrible Metaphor for Business (Harvard Business Review)
    Stock Market || Forex Articles
    Trading blogs || My blog

  4. #374
    Senior Member mql5's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,679
    Blog Entries
    533

    MQL5 programming language: Advanced use of the trading platform MetaTrader 5: Creating trading robots and indicators

    MQL5 programming language: Advanced use of the trading platform MetaTrader 5: Creating trading robots and indicators
    by Timur Mashnin

    Development of indicators and advisors using the MQL5 programming language for the MetaTrader 5.

    Something to read-mql5_1.png


    Something to read-mql5_22.png
    Metatrader 5 / Metatrader 4 for MQL5 / MQL4 articles preview preview
    Trading blogs || My blog

  5. #375
    Administrator newdigital's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,998
    Blog Entries
    1762
    Follow newdigital On Twitter Add newdigital on Facebook Add newdigital on Google+ Add newdigital on MySpace
    Add newdigital on Linkedin

    Mastering Hurst Cycle Analysis

    Mastering Hurst Cycle Analysis: A modern treatment of Hurst's original system of financial market analysis

    Something to read-41gwxc68m-l._sx330_bo15204y203t200_.jpg


    In 2011 the work of J. M. Hurst, considered by many as the father of modern cyclic analysis, enjoyed sudden and renewed interest by the trading community. This translated into several works approaching Hurst's methods from three different angles.

    Just as stated by the author, it will help readers get a better grasp and understanding of Hurst's work, at a fraction of the the cost of his original private course. It will even provide buyers with the relevant code for Tradestation and Updata. This way, if you're tech savvy and already own one of these charting packages, or don't mind the additional investment needed to use them, you will be able to experiment further with the concepts covered in the book. Since it contains the code for all the different cycles, channels and other indicators, the author spares the reader the math details of Hurst's work, which may be for the best, since this has always been one of the stumbling blocks in applying Hurst's methods.

    The self-proclaimed goal of the author is to lead the reader to a stage where he can perform his own cyclic analysis. The bottom line is that how well you master Hurst's methods after reading this book, as with so many other things in life and trading, will depend solely on how much work you're willing to put into experimenting with the concepts.

    The book ends with a concise summary of the different theories explaining the causes of cycles, which should stimulate even further research into this fascinating subject.

    Mr Grafton mentions the Sentient Trader software, by David Hickson, which covers similar ground. The author of that software has, understandably, undertaken a different approach: there is no code sharing, but instead a sleek black box, which generates trading signals based on Hurst's original work.

    There is also the OddsTrader app, by CIT Dates, which is currently the only mobile app that allows users to chart Hurst channels and to use them as the basis for several different trading strategies. It even includes a built-in risk management and position sizing tool.

    In summary, if you're interested in cycles and cyclic analysis, there has hardly been a better time for delving into and exploring the subject.

    =============

    The analysis of S&P 500 from this site:

    Something to read-hurst-trading-cycles-analysis-sp-500-index.png
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription, public discussion and latest news
    Trading Forum wiki || Social networks for the forum
    Trading blogs || My blog
    ePayments: premium subscription without paypal

  6. #376
    Senior Member GottaNew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    117
    Blog Entries
    102

    New crypto-currency, bitcoin cash

    Bitcoin’s underlying software code was split on Tuesday, generating a new clone called "bitcoin cash", but the new virtual currency got off to a slow start due to lacklustre support for its network.

    Something to read-btcusd-h4-fx-choice-limited.png


    The initiative was headed by a small group of mostly China-based bitcoin miners — programmers who essentially operate the bitcoin network — who were not happy with scheduled improvements to the currency’s technology meant to increase its capacity to process transactions.

    It’s been a slow start for bitcoin cash," said Iqbal Gandham, MD at trading platform eToro. "The delay ... could be a result of a lack of miner support for the new crypto-currency." On Tuesday, bitcoin cash traded on certain exchanges at a median price of $146.37, according to BitInfoCharts.com, while bitcoin was at $2,729 on the Bitstamp platform, down 4.6% from Monday.

    the source

    Trading Blogs || My Blog

  7. #377
    Senior Member 1Finance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,519
    Blog Entries
    340

    Machine Learning Books

    10 free books related to Machine Learning (based on thepixelbeard.com portal).

    1. The Elements Of Statistical Learning : Data Mining, Inference and Prediction
    This is an ebook by T.Hastie, R. Tibshirani, J.Friedman that lets readers get knowledge about conceptual underpinnings. There are varied topics included like statistical framework and much more.

    2. Inductive Logical Programming
    Inductive logic programming is a topic in Machine Learning. It is used in research field at the intersection of machine learning and logic programming.

    3. Reinforcement Learning : An introduction by Richard S. Sutton, Andrew G. Barto
    This is an ebook written by Richard S. Sutton, Andrew G. Barto. With this ebook users can get a grasp of machine learning the easy way.

    4. Information Theory, Inference and Learning Algorithms
    This is an ebook by David J.C. Mackay in which information theory topic is well explained in such a way that it helps readers attain good knowledge about the practical communication systems viz. arithmetic coding for data compression, sparse-graph codes for error-correction and more.

    5. Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning
    This is an ebook by Carl E. Rasmussen, Chritopher K.I Williams. With this ebook one can learn a principled, practical, probabilistic approach to learning in kernel machines in quite a simple way.

    6. The LION Way
    This ebook is written by Roberto Battiti, Mauro Brunato and has been written in such a way that it helps users in machine learning and Intelligent Optimization (LION).

    7. Bayesian Reasoning and Machine Learning
    This is an ebook that is written by David Barber that targets the final-year undergraduates and master’s students. The topics include linear algebra and calculus. This book helps users learn basic reasoning, advanced techniques within the framework of graphical models and develop skills.

    8. A Course In Machine Learning
    This ebook by Hal Daume III is a course book that includes a set of introductory material covering different aspects of modern machine learning.

    9. Machine Learning, Neural And Statistical Classification
    This is an ebook by D. Michie, D.J Spiegelhalter that aims at providing an up-to-date review of different approaches to classification.

    10. Introduction To Machine Learning
    This ebook is written by Nilis J Nilsson. It includes different topics in machine learning circa 1996 that helps people pursue a middle ground between theory and practice.
    Last edited by 1Finance; 08-25-2017 at 11:18 AM.
    Trading blogs || My blog

  8. #378
    Senior Member ArticleMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    271
    Blog Entries
    155

    Expert Advisor Programming for MetaTrader 4

    Expert Advisor Programming for MetaTrader 4

    Something to read-4135twjmthl.jpg


    This book will teach you the following concepts:
    • The basic of the MLQ4 language, including variables and data types, operations, conditional and loop operators, functions, classes and objects, event handlers and more.
    • Place, modify and close market and pending orders.
    • Add a stop loss and/or take profit price to an individual order, or to multiple orders.
    • Close orders individually or by order type.
    • Get a total of all currently opened orders.
    • Work with OHLC bar data and locate basic candlestick patterns.
    • Find the highest high and lowest low of recent bars.
    • Work with MetaTrader’s built-in indicators, as well as custom indicators.
    • Add a trailing stop or break even stop feature to an expert advisor.
    • Use money management and lot size verification techniques.
    • Add a flexible trading timer to an expert advisor.
    • Construct several types of trading systems, including trend, counter-trend and breakout systems.
    • Add alert, emails, sounds and other notifications.
    • Add and manipulate chart objects.
    • Read and write to CSV files.
    • Construct basic indicators, scripts and libraries.
    • Learn how to effective debug your programs, and use the Strategy Tester to test your strategies.

    All of the source code in this book is available for download, including an expert advisor framework that allows you to build robust and fully-featured expert advisors with minimal effort.
    Stock Market || Forex Articles
    Trading blogs || My blog

  9. #379
    Senior Member ArticleMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    271
    Blog Entries
    155

    Expert Advisor Programming for MetaTrader 5

    Expert Advisor Programming for MetaTrader 5

    Something to read-9780982645925.jpg


    This book will teach you the following concepts:
    • Learn the basics of MQL5, including variables and data types, operators, functions, event handlers, and object-oriented programming.
    • Place, modify and close market and pending orders.
    • Calculate, verify and add stop loss and take profit prices to an open position.
    • Add a flexible trailing stop and/or break even stop to your strategy.
    • Manage your trade risk with money management.
    • Use pending orders to scale in and out of positions.
    • Use price, time and indicator data in your expert advisors.
    • Control program execution by trading on new bar open, and add flexible trade timers to your strategies.
    • Walk through the creation of several basic trading strategies from start to finish.
    • Inform the user with dialog boxes, email alerts, mobile notifications and sounds.
    • Draw trend lines, arrows and text labels on the chart.
    • Read and write data to CSV files.
    • Learn the basics of creating indicators, scripts and libraries in MetaEditor.
    • Debug, test and optimize your trading strategy.
    • And much more!

    Whether you’re an experienced programmer moving from MQL4, or a novice just starting with MQL5, this book will give you the foundation to quickly program fully-featured and robust trading systems.
    Last edited by ArticleMan; 09-16-2017 at 04:57 AM.
    Stock Market || Forex Articles
    Trading blogs || My blog

  10. #380
    Senior Member ChinaVirtuoso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    768
    Blog Entries
    212

    The Holy Grail Trading System

    The Holy Grail Trading System by James Windsor

    Something to read-hollyread.png


    The true story of a 100% mechanical automated forex trading system that returned over 1000% inside 13 months turning 10,000 GBP to over 100,000 GBP.

    Fully Disclosed...
    • Trade by trade entry levels
    • Trading timeframes
    • Trade exit levels
    • Optimum risk management strategy
    • Trailing stop settings
    • Full results and account screenshots
    Public discussion on premium trading forum || China Tech News
    Trading blogs || My blog

Page 38 of 42 FirstFirst ... 28 36 37 38 39 40 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •