Premium 468x60 arts
Page 96 of 162 FirstFirst ... 46 86 94 95 96 97 98 106 146 ... LastLast
Results 951 to 960 of 1612
Like Tree5Likes

Art Photos mixed

This is a discussion on Art Photos mixed within the Photos forums, part of the Fine Art category; Seeing what kind of art curators choose to live with is like finding out where chefs go to dinner. They ...

      
   
  1. #951
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    The 46 paintings, works on paper and objects lead Christie’s Old Masters sale in New York

    Seeing what kind of art curators choose to live with is like finding out where chefs go to dinner. They may not make the obvious or fashionable choice, but they usually have a good reason. Next month, Christie’s is due to sell works from the eclectic collection of Everett Fahy, the former curator of European paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the former director of the Frick Collection in New York. The 46 paintings, works on paper and objects will lead Christie’s Old Masters sale on 26 October in New York.

    Some of the works, which span the 14th to the 20th centuries, were gifts Fahy received from famous friends. The socialite Brooke Astor gave him a Chinese carved jade disc from the late 19th century (est $1,000-$1,500). The sale’s top lot is a fragment of an early 14th-century panel painting of Saint Peter attributed to the Circle of Duccio Di Buoninsegna (est $150,000-$250,000). The tempera and gold painting was one of several gifts from Sir John Pope-Hennessy, Fahy’s mentor and predecessor as chairman of European paintings at the Met.

    Name:  art1.png
Views: 46
Size:  188.0 KB

    Name:  art2.png
Views: 63
Size:  162.8 KB

    All told, the collection is expected to make $353,800 to $554,400. Some small sculptures and drawings carry estimates as low as $400. Specialists hope that the modest price points and eclectic mix of objects will appeal to collectors in town for the first New York edition of the European Fine Art Fair (Tefaf) (22-26 October). Fahy “has listed a significant portion of the collection with no reserve, so it’s an opportunity to have wildly low prices achieved for really amazing things,” says the specialist Emma Kronman.Fahy worked as a consultant to the Christie’s Old Masters department after he left the Met in 2009. He lived with his collection in a Mark Hampton-designed apartment on New York’s Upper West Side until recently, when ill health caused him to downsize and move closer to his family.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  2. #952
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    ‘Enigmatic’ French artist Pierre Huyghe wins $100,000 Nasher Prize for sculpture

    The French artist Pierre Huyghe has won the $100,000 Nasher Prize, the world’s largest award for sculpture, given out by the Nasher Sculpture Centre in Dallas. The jury made up of curators and artists—including Nicholas Serota, Okwui Enwezor, Phyllida Barlow, Huma Bhabba, Pablo León de la Barra—selected Huyghe from a list of 150 nominees.Long recognised as one of the key representatives of “relational aesthetics”, a term coined by the French art critic Nicolas Bourriaud to describe art that often involves creating a shared social experience, Huyghe’s work encompass disciplines such as cinema, music, theater and sculpture. Many of his best known piece incorporate living elements like bees, crabs, dogs and microorganisms and immaterial elements such as fog, light, and scents.



    Pierre Huyghe, Untilled (2011-12), living entities and inanimate things, made or not made



    Pierre Huyghe, Untitled (Human Mask) (2014), film, colour, sound



    Pierre Huyghe, A Forest of Lines (July 2008), event, Sydney Opera House, film, colour, sound (Image: Paul Green)

    The work of this “very enigmatic” artist, says Okwui Enwezor, “extends far beyond any tidy definition of sculpture”. The Nasher’s director Jeremy Strick agrees: “[Huyghe’s] expansive view of sculpture so wonderfully embodies the goal of the Nasher Prize, which is to champion the greatest artistic minds of our time.”In addition to the prize money, the artist will also receive an award especially designed by Renzo Piano, the architect of the Nasher Sculpture Center, during a ceremony in Dallas on 1 April 2017. It does not, however, come with a special commission or exhibition. The prize was launched last year and given to the Colombian artist Doris Salcedo. The presenting sponsor is JPMorgan Chase & Co.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  3. #953
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    Why so serious? Dose of humour comes to Barbican



    Bedwyr Williams says The Gulch, his first solo show in a London institution, will be full of “theatrical moments” and “little embarrassments”. The Welsh artist has plotted an assault course of six immersive environments to lead visitors through the 90m-long, 6m-high sweep of the Barbican’s Curve gallery.Navigating absurd set pieces including a smugglers’ cove, an intimidating boardroom and a rocky ravine, “the audience will become performers”, Williams says. Contemporary art, he adds, also has a funny side. The exhibition is supported by Arts Council England and the Henry Moore Foundation.

    Were you daunted by the Curve as an exhibition space?
    It could be even longer or even taller, I’d be happy with that. Anything that allows me to make installations that are theatrical in terms of scale. For making a quest-type exhibition or a little journey, it was perfect. It’s about the same height as a theatre set.

    The exhibition has a series of tricks in store for visitors.
    It’s that kind of space because when you enter you can’t see the end of it. It makes you think about missing out on things. It’s not a shared experience kind of room. If a man has a heart attack halfway along it, the people at the beginning don’t know. They see the paramedics running and they don’t see him collapse. It’s a good space to goof around with a linear narrative.

    What does the title mean?
    A gulch is a dried-out crevasse or ravine. In the Beano there used to be a character called Baby Face Finlayson and he lived in Vulture Gulch, so it’s more of an American or an Australian term. For me the Curve, because it’s high-sided, is a kind of ravine. I like the sound of it.

    You’re also writing and performing an audio walk for the Barbican centre outside the gallery.
    There’s going to be dummy replicas of laptops and smartphones attached to the tables, maybe 100 of them, and you’ll be able to plug your headphones in. It will be a mix of field recordings using the format of a conventional audioguide and filling it with nonsense. It’ll be something to do with the people who hot-desk here, imagining what the water cooler conversations between them would be. I’ve always been fascinated with the Barbican. When I was a kid in the 80s all art centres looked like this—low lighting, people padding around in a very serious manner. It’s pregnant with potential.

    Why did you become an artist?
    Being an artist and working across media, you can pretty much have a stab at anything. I write, I take photographs, I draw and perform and I collaborate with people who do all those things. But even though you can do anything, artists still follow a lot of conventions. Young artists still make little shows with plinths and there’s a way of looking at these things. I’m not interested in doing that and that’s why I like working with theatre makers. I like the artifice of the theatre. People still ask me to make more of these immersive things, but I’m not doing it for any academic reason. I liked model trains as a kid and I like making miniature landscapes.

    Was it always your intention to introduce comedy to contemporary art?
    Even when I was 18 doing a foundation course in north Wales I remember thinking it was daft that it’s all so serious. How come art is allowed to be sad but not funny? You do a performance and in an art situation as opposed to a comedy club people would put up with anything. I can’t help but mock that freedom. The art world is very pompous, so it’s completely ripe for it.

    How do you define the British sense of humour?
    I think the British sense of humour is very special. When I’ve spent extended times overseas it’s the thing I miss the most. It’s fatalistic and self-deprecating, a little bit pompous but able to laugh at itself. There’s a kind of disquiet in Britain all the time, like a really rowdy pub just waiting to boil over.

    You represented Wales at the Venice Biennale. What does Welshness mean to you?
    I don’t reference it in my work to make any political point but I love having that take on being British. I learnt English when I was five and think it’s amazing how much you can do with it as a language. I can’t imagine making work without using language.

    Has Brexit had any impact on your work?
    Maybe. I’m making a new work for Artes Mundi in Cardiff about a fictional city built in the mountains in mid-Wales. It’s hard not to think about what’s happening. I think it’s actually quite an exciting time to be an artist, also because I don’t live in London. Apocalyptic films always start in the city and then flee to the countryside. It’s when you get into the ‘burbs that you get the true horror of it. Observing Brexit from north Wales has been quite weird. It would have been depressing in London as well but at least you can go for tapas or something.

    Do you prefer to work away from London?
    Yes, it suits me. Also as I’ve got older, I think I’ve found a way of working that gets all my little interests together. That’s satisfying because then I can concentrate on making [video installations] as good as I can, instead of agonising about the form of it.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  4. #954
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    David Shrigley’s big thumb unveiled in Trafalgar Square



    Londoners and art world professionals gave the thumbs up for David Shrigley’s new public art commission standing on the Fourth Plinth, which was unveiled today in Trafalgar Square in the heart of London (29 September). The seven-metre-high piece, entitled Really Good, is an outlandishly long thumb cast in bronze with the same dark patina as the other classic statues in the square.Shrigley, who was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2013, hopes that the gesture will become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Things considered “bad, such as the economy, the weather and society will benefit from a change of consensus towards positivity”, he says.

    Gabriele Finaldi, the director of the National Gallery, welcomed the new addition. “It’s very impressive, I can see it from my office window,” he says. Earlier this year, he told The Art Newspaper that “the Fourth Plinth is a brilliant way to make art connect with contemporary people.”

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  5. #955
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    Sunset at Playas Avellanas, Costa Rica

    Sunset at Playas Avellanas, Costa Rica

    Name:  Sunset at Playas Avellanas, Costa Rica.jpg
Views: 62
Size:  95.8 KB
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  6. #956
    Senior Member MusicNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,167
    Blog Entries
    930

    34 Million U.S. Consumers Intend to Buy AirPod Wireless Earbuds

    Apple’s decision to go wireless may have been courageous after all. A new study revealed some shocking results about the AirPod.

    Name:  AirPod.jpg
Views: 58
Size:  45.7 KB


    Some users even threatened to skip the iPhone 7 altogether.

    Despite how you personally feel about the AirPods, there’s no denying that the wireless earbuds are sporting awesome technology. The brand-new Apple W1 chip embedded in the earbuds comes with dual optical sensors and accelerometers. This allows the earbuds to detect when they’re in your ear.

    There’s also a long battery life, giving users up to 5 hours of enjoyment with just one charge.

    the source
    Trading Forum wiki || My thread: Music News
    Trading blogs || My blog

  7. #957
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    Frieze London 2016

    Discover the world’s most exciting artists, from the emerging to the iconic

    Frieze London features more than 160 of the world’s leading galleries. View and buy art from over 1,000 of today’s leading artists, and experience the fair’s critically acclaimed Frieze Projects and Talks programmes.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  8. #958
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    France to increase funding for museums and acquisitions in 2017 budget



    France’s Minister of Culture and Communication, Audrey Azoulay, has pledged to “substantially” increase funding for French museums next year. “I know the difficulties confronting museums today, between a drop in attendance, particularly linked to the drop in tourism, and a rise in security expenses,” she said in her official speech on 28 September to present the department’s 2017 budget. As part of this, cultural funding will increase by 6.6% to a total of €2.9bn—the largest amount of government money promised for the arts in the country’s history.Azoulay announced a 5% increase in funding to museums, and, notably, an increase of 12% for acquisitions budgets for regional and national museums. She said that museums security would be partly supported by an intra-ministerial fund. The government is also organising a conference on cultural tourism in December to try and revive the sector.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  9. #959
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    Race across the city: Art in Odd Places festival returns to New York’s 14th Street



    “You don’t need a door”: this is how Ed Woodham, the founder and director of the grassroots public art non-profit Art in Odd Places, defines “public art”, explains Elissa Moorhead, a co-curator of the ninth edition of the eponymous festival. The door-less event takes place this week (6-9 October) in New York along 14th Street, from Avenue C in the East Village all the way west to the Hudson River. The 2016 theme is Race—not only an extremely timely topic, but also relevant to the festival’s setting, in particular, its crossing of Union Square. “It’s a site where there were lots of residents that were black and brown, and they’re not there now,” Moorhead says.

    “It’s a super interesting place to investigate the idea of race literally, and the idea of the race of a city, the fast-changing demographics.”The festival features more than 30 works, including performance pieces, installations and film projections. Some are stationary, such as Eric Olson’s bubble machine Imagine, a reference to “How many bubbles in a bar of soap?” a Jim Crow-era question designed to block minorities from voting. Others are more mobile, like the performance In Interactive Median Income Dress Acting As a Social Interface, in which the artist Dominique Paul will walk across 14th Street wearing a dress with coloured lights that change based on the income levels of the different blocks.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

  10. #960
    Senior Member PhotoNews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,612
    Blog Entries
    1337

    Collectors mix their own drinks at Frieze London



    Everyone loves to show off a bit at Frieze, and extrovert visitors have been taking full advantage of the karaoke machine on A Gentil Carioca’s stand, provided by the Rio-based artist’s collective Opavivará! At yesterday’s preview, Frank Sinatra’s New York, New York seemed especially popular—and for those feeling a little shy, another Opavivará! work takes the form of a cocktail trolley laden with Aperol, vodka, whisky and rum, with a juicer attached. But any drink-dispensing is strictly DIY, with a gallery staffer keen to emphasise to thirsty collectors that “I’m not a barman”. And to drive the point home, a washing-up station is parked nearby to deal with any accidental spillages.

    more...
    Premium Trading Forum: subscription || Latest premium section news
    Art Photos mixed || National photos
    Trading blogs || My blog

Page 96 of 162 FirstFirst ... 46 86 94 95 96 97 98 106 146 ... LastLast

LinkBacks (?)

  1. 07-10-2014, 12:23 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •